This one body part is about to change colour

One of your mate’s most adorable and obvious body parts is about to change colour. And it’s all thanks to this current cold blast…
Here’s what you can do about it…

It’s one of the busiest parts of their body. But don’t think for a second that the nose takes a break over winter. In fact, far from it. Aside from the standard array of smells and that persistent social sniffing in the park, their nose actually does something quite surprising in winter. It changes colour.

Keep an eye out over the next month and you’ll see black noses become brown and brown noses become light tan or even pink.

Did you know? The breeds most affected are Golden Retrievers, Labradors, Boston Terriers, French Bulldogs, Malamutes and Samoyeds. But light coloured breeds and crosses see the changes most dramatically. Cats can also experience a winter colour change...

 

But why does it happen and what does it mean?


Well, the colour change is the result of an enzyme called tyrosinase essentially switching off in the cold weather and reduced sunlight. In warmer weather, this enzyme works with a crucial amino acid called Tyrosin to produces pigment in the nose.

Without it, the colour of their nose becomes rapidly diluted.


It’s a clear sign your dog or cat’s extremities are feeling the polar blast we’ve all been shivering through.


It’s also a visual reminder that the lack of sunlight and warmth makes it harder for the furry family to get all the nutrients they need to be at their vibrant best through the winter…

The richest natural sources of the amino acid tyrosin are quality proteins like chicken breast (like I use in my treats) and red meat. Processing of these proteins (like in meals) can degrade the crucial amino acids like tyrosin. Other useful sources include dairy products, eggs and strangely enough, pumpkin seeds. 

Something to paw over...